Rebelené


About

Rebelené is the chosen moniker of Zelene Pineda Suchilt, a Mexican born CHí-CHí (CHilanga/CHicana) award-winning multidisciplinary artist, filmmaker and poet living in New York City.

Her work is rooted in the oral tradition of Indigenous Mexican, American and CHicano storytelling employing metaphors as storehouses for trans-generational healing. Rebelené takes a multidisciplinary collaborative approach that juxtaposes indigenous concepts and urban culture to bridge art and social justice praxis. She works with a range of media including writing, painting,  photography, live-performance and film production. 

Born in Coyoacán, Mexico City, Zelene migrated to Houston via NAFTA and studied anthropology in El Paso, Texas. She lived the undocumented experience for 13 years and was a focal figure in immigrant rights in Texas and New York City. She has organized campaigns around decolonization, literacy, environmental justice, and human rights. 

Zelene founded of the Word Around Town Poetry Tour in 2005 and participated in the Librotraficante Caravan in 2012 as Librotraficante Rebelené.  She received the Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz Young Visionary Award from The National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago in 2009.


Additional Information

Artist Statement My poetry is rooted in the oral tradition of Indigenous Mexican, American and CHicano storytelling that employs metaphors as storehouses for trans-generational healing. Through the manipulation of Spanish and Nahuatl within a work primarily written in English, words are given vision and a purpose beyond colonization, like seeds during a drought, they transform colonized tongues into bridges for ancestors. My multidisciplinary work explores the nuances of womanhood, queer sensuality and post-colonial indigenous transnational identity. Employing storytelling techniques, they provide a multi-sensorial experience for audiences through the blending of documentary, performance, animation and sound arts. My collaborations embody the traditions of border-crossing movements that push the conventions of institutional art and politics through solidarity. Rebelené Films are made without institutional support and do not adhere to genre, social-constructs or market-driven filmmaking. They are made to simultaneously converse with literature, cinema, and to decolonize transnational feminist motifs.

The Mango Poem (2014) is a moving self-portrait that explores identity and intimacy through the metaphor of a mango.

The Wave: a prayer for sa
“Waiting for Sun” (2019)